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Home/Curriculum resources/Co-design in fire management /Activity 1 – Fire in your community

Subject:

Technologies

Year level:

Level 5, Level 6

A photograph of a burnt patch of bush with some patches of fire still visible and lots of ash and burnt materials.

Activity 1 – Fire in your community

This activity is a part of the Co-design in fire management resource.

Afterburn. Mornington Island, Lardil country. Photographer: Joe Sambono. Source: Ngarrngga. © Joe Sambono 2023. Used with permission

Students will research background information on their local area to inform their bushfire management plan map in Activity 2. 

Step-by-step guide

Step 1: Research

Students can break into groups to research one subheading and compile information as a class. Subheadings include: 

  • General overview of area – region, population, urban or rural, plantations, national parks, etc. 

  • Climate – growing season, rainfall, length of hot dry weather, lightning 

  • Topography – flat, undulating, mountainous, river systems 

  • Bushfire fuels – vegetation types, how much area they cover, how dense are they? 

  • Assets – town sites, construction areas, bridges, other infrastructure, historical sites, Aboriginal cultural sites, bush areas of high conservation value 

  • Access – description of type and quality of roads – e.g. one-way, two-way, gravel, 4WD only. Note any barriers, e.g. swamps, rivers, sand ridges 

  • Water supply – both domestic and external – hydrants, rivers, tanks, bores. 

Step 2: Traditional Fire Knowledge

Research local traditional fire knowledge if available. The best place would be to ask a local Aboriginal corporation or other organisation for assistance. 

Step 3: Inquiry-based question discussion

  1. Based on this information, discuss the following inquiry-based questions: 

  • When would be the safest time of year to do burning, or times of year or particular conditions on a daily basis that should be avoided? 

  • What local groups are responsible for fire management – Country Fire Service, State Emergency Services, council, rangers, landholders etc, or a combination of these? What kind of activities do they do? 

  • How could you involve multiple groups in working together to make a plan to manage fire together? 

  • Discuss personal experiences: have you ever experienced a big fire, does your family have a bushfire plan at home? 

Related activities within this resources:

A photograph of a burnt patch of bush with some patches of fire still visible and lots of ash and burnt materials.

Activity 2 – Mapping for fire management

Following on from Activity 1, students will work through a process of compiling information into maps and discussing fire management as a group, similar to the process of compiling a community Fire Management Plan.

Required resources:

A3 paper, tracing paper, markers and pencils

A photograph of a burnt patch of bush with some patches of fire still visible and lots of ash and burnt materials.

Activity 3 - Bridge Thinking Routine

Students use a bridge thinking routine to support exploring fire management practices. Students should begin this routine before reading the co-design in fire management information sheet.

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